Venus Cloud Tops Viewed by Hubble. This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet-light image of the planet Venus, taken on January 24 1995, when Venus was at a distance of 70.6 million miles (113.6 million kilometers) from Earth. Venus is covered with clouds made of sulfuric acid, rather than the water-vapor clouds found on Earth. These clouds permanently shroud Venus' volcanic surface, which has been radar mapped by spacecraft and from Earth-based telescope. At ultraviolet wavelengths cloud patterns become distinctive. In particular, a horizontal "Y"-shaped cloud feature is visible near the equator. Similar features were seen from Mariner 10, Pioneer Venus, and Galileo spacecrafts. This global feature might indicate atmospheric waves, analogous to high and low pressure cells on…
This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from NASAs Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, is a look westward across the Fortuna Tessera toward the slopes of Maxwell Montes.
This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from NASAs Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, is a look westward across the Fortuna Tessera toward the slopes of Maxwell Montes.
This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from NASAs Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows part of the lowland plains in Sedna Planitia.
This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from NASAs Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows part of the lowland plains in Sedna Planitia. Circular depressions with associated fracture patterns, called coronae.
This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from NASAs Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows the impact crater Markham, named after the English aviator Beryl Markham.
This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from NASAs Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows the boundary between the lowland plains and characteristic Venusian highland terrain in Ovda Region.